Tag Archives: TippingPoint

“high price bug brokering market just isn’t viable”

On January 17, 2007, SnoSoft / Netragard LLC announced a new Exploit Acquisition Program designed to compete with iDefense, TippingPoint and others. Nothing special or different other than the suggestion that they would pay more for high end vulnerabilities. A little over a year later, and they announced they were shutting down the Exploit Acquisition Program. From their post:

We regret to say that its true, we’ve shut down the Exploit Acquisition Program. The reason for the shutdown was that it was taking our buyers too long to complete a single transaction and it wasn’t fair to the researchers. While we’d expect a single transaction to take no more than a month, the average transaction time for our buyer was 4 months. The last transaction that we attempted took 7 months at which point the issues were silently patched and the transaction was dead. As it stands right now, we can’t justify asking anyone to wait that long to move a single item. So until the end players learn how to move faster, the high price bug brokering market just isn’t viable.

No offense to SnoSoft / Netragard, but their competitors have proven that the market is viable. I guess the trick is how you ‘sell’ the information. For iDefense it is early warning for their customers in case the same vulnerability is being exploited by others. For TippingPoint it is early warning and IPS signatures. For WabiSabiLabi it is more like the SnoSoft program, where one buyer gets exclusive rights to the information, and it appears to be working to some degree.

Pot, Kettle, Black……?

I saw this article the other day, IBM Scolds TippingPoint Over Hacking Contest and figured now what? But I decided it would be an interesting read.

A couple quick blurbs from the article:

IBM’s ISS division has torn into rival TippingPoint for sponsoring the hacking contest that led to the disclosure of a QuickTime vulnerability in Apple’s Safari browser. “IBM Internet Security Systems agrees with Gartner’s assessment that “public vulnerability research and ‘hacking contests’ are risky endeavors, and can run contrary to responsible disclosure practices.” It is for this reason that IBM ISS strongly adheres to its well-established responsible disclosure guidelines.”

Once I read the article it was then that I realized…. that it really wasn’t IBM, but ISS (who IBM purchased recently) that was scolding TippingPoint for sponsoring this contest. Immediately I thought about all the drama that went on when ISS disclosed their Apache Chunked Encoding Overflow back in 2002.

http://lwn.net/Articles/2756/ It all looks like a fairly normal response to security problems in the free software community, until you look a little more closely. It turns out that the Apache group was already aware of the problem and was working on a fix. The Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) also was already involved. It also turns out that the ISS patch does not completely fix the problem. ISS, in its hurry to publicise the vulnerability, had not checked with either CERT or the Apache Software Foundation.

Does anyone remember all of this?

ISS took quite a bit of criticism for this disclosure and responded publicly to clean up any confusion and misunderstanding.

The very last portion of this posting is what I find real interesting:

ISS has made these decisions based on our mission to provide the best security to our customers and being a trusted security advisor.

For me personally.. It is kind of funny that disclosure almost always seems to come back to the argument of… we did it for the greater good… we did it for the benefit of others… we did it for the right reasons…

But you on the other hand…

touché.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,027 other followers