Tag Archives: Oracle

It’s patch xxxday!

A while back, Microsoft announced they were moving to release patches on the second Tuesday of each month, lovingly called Patch Tuesday. Soon after, Oracle announced that they too would be moving to scheduled releases of patches on the Tuesday closest to the 15th day of January, April, July and October. Now, Cisco has announced they are moving to scheduled patches on the fourth Wednesday of the month in March and September of each calendar year.

In the attempt to make life easier on administrators and help avoid installing patches every few days, these scheduled releases are now causing organizations to enjoy life between monster patches.

Mar 11 – Microsoft
Mar 26 – Cisco
Apr 8 – Microsoft
Apr 15 – Oracle
May 13 – Microsoft
June 10 – Microsoft
July 8 – Microsoft
July 15 – Oracle
August 12 – Microsoft
September 9 – Microsoft
September 24 – Cisco
October 14 – Microsoft, Oracle
November 11 – Microsoft
December 9 – Microsoft

As you can see, October 14 promises to be a lot of fun for companies running Oracle products on Microsoft systems. While the scheduled dates look safe, I can’t wait until we see the ”perfect storm” of vendor patches.

2007 Top Vulnerable Vendors?

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2184206,00.asp
http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Security/Report-MS-Apple-Oracle-Are-Top-Vulnerable-Vendors/

New IBM research shows that five vendors are responsible for 12.6 percent of all disclosed vulnerabilities. Not surprising: In the first half of 2007, Microsoft was the top vendor when it came to publicly disclosed vulnerabilities. Likely surprising to some: Apple got second place. IBM Internet Security Systems’ X-Force R&D team released its 2007 report on cyber attacks on Sept. 17, revealing that the top five vulnerable vendors accounted for 12.6 of all disclosed vulnerabilities in the first half of the yearor 411 of 3,272 vulnerabilities disclosed. Here’s the order in which the top 10 vendors stacked up, by percentage of vulnerabilities publicly disclosed in the first half of the year: Microsoft, 4.2 percent Apple, 3 percent Oracle, 2 percent Cisco Systems, 1.9 percent Sun Microsystems, 1.5 percent IBM, 1.3 percent Mozilla, 1.3 percent XOOPS, 1.2 percent BEA, 1.1 percent Linux kernel, 0.9 percent

This article was posted to ISN the other day and struck a nerve. How many times are we going to see vulnerability statistics presented without qualification? Rather than really get into the details, I replied with a single simple example on why such statistics are misleading at best and incorrect at worst. The bulk of my reply follows. My hopes for Lisa or IBM/ISS clarifying this is already dwindling.

One other factor, that Lisa Vaas apparently didn’t ask about, is how ISS X-Force catalogs vulnerabilities, and if their method and standards could impact these numbers at all. Take for example, two X-Force vulnerability database entries: Oracle Critical Patch Update – July 2007 http://xforce.iss.net/xforce/xfdb/35490 18 CVE, 30+ Oracle Oracle Critical Patch Update – January 2007 http://xforce.iss.net/xforce/xfdb/31541 30 CVE, 50+ Oracle So when comparing numbers, you have 2 X-Force entries that equate to 48 CVE entries that equate to *more than 80* unique and distinct vulnerabilities according to Oracle. I’m not a math or stat guy, but I have a feeling that this could seriously skew the statistics above, especially when you consider that Microsoft and Apple both have a more distinct breakdown and separation in the X-Force database. Anyone from IBM/ISS care to clarify? Lisa, did you have more extensive notes on this aspect that didn’t make it in the article perhaps?

Weak of Oracle Bugs

No, not a typo. A couple weeks back, Argeniss “was proud to announce that we are starting on December the “Week of Oracle Database Bugs” (WoODB).” A couple days ago they abruptly called off the WoODB with the following message:

We are sad to announce that due to many problems the Week of Oracle Database Bugs gets suspended.

We would like to ask for apologizes to people who supported this and were really excited with the idea, also we would like to thank the people who contributed with Oracle vulnerabilities.

It’s hard to ignore the obvious possibility (especially with so many other people saying the same) that they solicited the community to support their effort by submitting unpublished Oracle vulnerabilities, then arbitrarily shut the effort down while keeping all the information and not sharing it as stated. Argeniss, why not give us the full story? Were you threatened by Oracle? Drastic change of ethical stance? Pure greed when you realized the value of a hundred contributions?

Oracle Starts Using CVSS Risk Ratings

Oracle’s last quarterly critical patch update included some changes and started using CVSS to rate the severity of their vulnerabilities. Anyone that has ever tried to truly understand Oracle vulnerabilities most likely thought this would be a much needed improvement. The whole easy, difficult, wide, low, high ratings Oracle used previously made it almost impossible to figure out just how critical are the issues and then to prioritize the patch implementation.

Shortly after the October CPU was released, researchers started to question the CVSS ratings leading many to believe that Oracle is downplaying the true risk of the vulnerabilities.

Oracle also patched 13 remotely exploitable holes in its Application Server software, the highest of which the vendor rated as 4.7 out of 10. However, a closer examination of the flaws suggest that many of the ratings should be in the 8.0 range, said Caleb Sima, CTO of SPI Dynamics, an Atlanta-based security vendor that also reported bugs to Oracle. “The problem is, Oracle didn’t give enough details [for third parties] to be able to say exactly what the score should be,” Sima said. – Source

Oracle claims that they are listening to their customers and trying to help organizations really understand the true risk. However, it appears that for many of the vulnerabilities there contained even less detail with the new format than previously. Was the only real improvement to the advisories that questionable CVSS ratings were included?

Oracle RDBMS vs Microsoft SQL Server

http://www.databasesecurity.com/dbsec/comparison.pdf

Introduction

This paper will examine the differences between the security posture of Microsoft’s SQL Server and Oracle’s RDBMS based upon flaws reported by external security researchers and since fixed by the vendor in question. Only flaws affecting the database server software itself have been considered in compiling this data so issues that affect, for example, Oracle Application Server have not been included. The sources of information used whilst compiling the data that forms the basis of this document include:

The Microsoft Security Bulletins web page
The Oracle Security Alerts web page
The CVE website at Mitre.
The SecurityFocus.com website

A general comparison is made covering Oracle 8, 9 and 10 against SQL Server 7, 2000 and 2005. The vendors� flagship database servers are then compared.

[..]

Vendor Disclosure Process

Ever wondered what some of the bigger vendors do in response to vulnerability Disclosure? Federico Biancuzzi has written an article on his Disclosure survey which may answer the question for you. Apple, Computer Associates, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Novell, Oracle, Red Hat, SAP, Sun Microsystems and Yahoo all answered to one degree or another. As always, some of the vendors are a bit weak in the description. Take Oracle for example, who says they want researchers to wait for their patch before disclosing. Next he asks the two big vulnerability purchasing shops iDefense and TippingPoint’s ZeroDayInitiative (ZDI) their thoughts. Finally, he asks three prominent researchers; David Litchfield, H D Moore and Michal Zalewski.

For journalists covering Oracle…

2004-08-04: 34 flaws found in Oracle database software
2004-09-03: US gov and sec firms warn of critical Oracle flaws
2004-10-15: Oracle Warns of Critical Exploits
2005-01-20: Oracle Patch Fixes 23 ‘Critical’ Vulnerabilities
2005-10-19: Oracle fixes bugs with mega patch
2006-01-18: Oracle fixes pile of bugs

In the interest of helping journalists cover Oracle.. perhaps they should just move to a templated form to save time?


[CATCHY_TITLE]
By [YOUR_NAME]
[YOUR TITLE], [YOUR PUBLICATION]
[DATE]

Oracle released on [DAY_OF_WEEK] fixes for a [LONG/HUGE/MONSTROUS] list of security vulnerabilities in [ONE/MANY/ALL] of its products. The quarterly patch contained patches for [NUMBER] vulnerabilities.

Titled “Critical Patch Update”, the patch provides [FIXES/REMEDIES/MITIGATION] for [NUMBER] flaws in the Database products, [NUMBER] flaws in the Application Server, [NUMBER] flaws in the COllaboration Suite, [NUMBER] of flaws in the E-Business Suite, [NUMBER] of flaws in the PeopleSoft Enterprise Portal, and [NUMBER] of flaws in the [NEW_TECHNOLOGY_OR_ACQUISITION].

Many of the flaws have been deemed critical by Oracle, meaning they are trivial to exploit, were likely discovered around 880 days ago, and are trivially abused by low to moderately skilled [HACKERS/ATTACKERS/CRACKERS]. Some of these flaws may be used in the next worm-of-the-week.

“[DULL_QUOTE_FROM_COMPANY_WHO_DISCOVERED_0_OF_THE_FLAWS]” security company [COMPANY] said yesterday as they upped their internet risk warning system number (IRWSN) to [ARBITRARY_NUMBER]. “This is another example of why our products will help protect customers who chose to deploy Oracle software” [ARBITRARY_CSO_NAME] stated.

“[BULLSHIT_QUOTE_ABOUT_PROACTIVE_SECURITY_FROM_ORACLE” countered Mary Ann Davidson, CSO at Oracle. “These hackers providing us with free security testing and showing their impatience after a mere 880 days are what causes problems. If these jackass criminals would stop being hackers, our products would not be broken into and our customers would stay safe!”

Oracle has been criticized for being slow to fix security flaws by everyone ranging from L0rD D1cKw4v3R to US-CERT to the Pope.

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