Tag Archives: Botnet

Ferreting Out Unique Vulnerability Data in OSVDB

In previous blog posts and on Twitter, I have shown and mentioned various methods for searching OSVDB to find interesting data. However, there is no written guide to the ins-and-outs of the data. The search interface is simple enough, but it can be used in a manner that allows for some complicated and useful searches that are not immediately obvious. This blog post will show several examples and highlight some of the interesting data we have available, along with an explanation to the method of our madness.

The OSVDB classification system allows for a variety of one-click searches. Using the search interface and selecting any of the classifications (single, or multiple) will let you quickly search for denial of service, exploit public, security software, and a lot more. Note that our data set is not complete, and not all of our entries have classification data. Do not rely on this type of search for complete results. Over time as the data set is completed, it will provide powerful one-click searches that will make for interesting metrics.

While our classification system is robust, it has been a struggle for us to determine if we want to add classes of issues as a new classification option, or use specific keywords that can be searched for. While a classification box is convenient, it can quickly become bloated if there are hundreds to choose from. We have “security software” as a classification because of the irony in software designed to protect you from threats adding to your vulnerability footprint. In the coming year, we may expand the ‘OSVDB’ classification box to allow for additional searches, where that box can be hidden entirely if desired. Until then, there are several fun keyword-based searches you can do:

  1. SCADA, the hot topic lately. Using the “vulnerability text” field, input “SCADA” and select “All Text” (defaults to “Titles only”). This will bring back all vulnerabilities related to SCADA products.
  2. Another field that has been interesting to us for several years, that will likely gain more attention this year in the wake of recent election problems, is Electronic Voting Machines. We’ve all read articles about the insecurity of Diebold for example. But have you looked at just how bad it is, and how bad the other vendors are? Do a “vulnerability text”, “all text” search for “electronic voting machine”. Prepare to be scared for the coming elections.
  3. There has been an increasing interest in vulnerabilities in embedded computers found in cars. While “car hacking” has been going on for many years, a big part of that field is based on modding and enhancing a car, not so much exploiting vulnerabilities in it. OSVDB has only delved into this topic a little bit so far, but it has been on our radar for some time. Doing the same “all text” search for the word “automobile” will bring up what we have. There are dozens of research papers and sites on our list to check out as time permits.
  4. We have spent a lot of time digging into the history of encryption algorithms, noting when they were effectively compromised or proven vulnerable to varying degrees of practical attacks. Having these in the database makes for an interesting history, great reference, and potentially helpful to pen-testers that find applications using insecure algorithms. Even if you don’t have time to leverage the weakness during the test, you can provide a standardized reference in the report. To find these, do a “vulnerability text”, “title only” search for the word “algorithm”.
  5. Using specific keywords in our standardized titles, quick searches can be performed for other interesting sets of vulnerabilities. For example, the word “hardcoded” is used to denote when a vendor uses an account name, password, community string, or other piece of identifying / security information in a manner that does not allow the user to change it. It is scary to see that hardcoded accounts and credentials are still being used in 2012, by security vendors no less. In a similar vein, the word “persistent” is used to denote other conditions where some form of weakness will continue to be present, regardless of administrative action.

Other interesting search tips:

  • “all text” word searches; botnet shows the increasing vulnerabilities found in botnet software
  • Want to find vulnerabilities in Drupal, but not all those third-party modules? Title search “drupal -module -theme” to see the ‘core’ software issues.
  • Similarly, title search for “wordpress” and “wordpress -plugin” to get a feel for the disparity in vulnerabilities between the core software and third-party plugins.

These represent just a few examples of the types of searches you can perform using OSVDB to ferret out interesting data and vulnerabilities that tend not to make it in the other VDBs.

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