Category Archives: OSVDB News

Mangle-A-Thon Boston

Mangle-A-Thon Boston
by D2D


Join OSF in Somerville, MA on September 19th, 2009 from 8am to midnight for Mangle-A-Thon, and help us mangle vulnerabilities into the Open Source Vulnerability Database (OSVDB), and mangle data loss incidents and primary sources into the DataLossDB.

The event, hosted by Midnight Research Labs Boston, is free and sponsored by Voltage Security, which will assist us in providing food and drink for attendees. OSF moderators will walk participants through the projects and teach participants how volunteers maintain the entirety of both data sets. Our goal is to get as much new and accurate data into both databases as possible, possibly add a couple of new recruits into the fold, and have a good time doing it.

Have suggestions regarding the projects? The lead developer (Dave) will be there, as will lead content guys for both projects (Kelly and Craig). You can actually see your suggestions implemented right there at the event… but only if you attend. :)


Midnight Research Labs Boston
30 Dane Street
Somerville, MA


Saturday, September 19th, 2009
8am to midnight
(three time slots: 8am – 1pm, 1pm – 6pm, 6pm – midnight, register for all or some)

Register via the “Register” link at:

Low Key Vegas

The Open Security Foundation and OSVDB members will once again be in Vegas this year. However for some reason we are all a bit tired….. so this year will be pretty low key! While we do not have anything officially planned most of the crew will be around for Defcon…….. so If you want to meet up to talk life, vulns, dataloss and drink a couple beers drop us a line.


by Lyger

Like many nights, Jericho and I had a conversation. Unlike many nights, this one might actually be of interest to someone other than us (this pertains to how OSVDB gets new data into queue):

jericho (6/16/2009 8:48:48 PM): Original Advisory: FEDORA-2009-5368
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:48:57 PM): so just need to bump the scrape down a line
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:50:32 PM): takes an extra 10 seconds per vuln
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:50:39 PM): but multiply by 100
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:50:43 PM): adds up
jericho (6/16/2009 8:50:56 PM): yep
jericho (6/16/2009 8:51:09 PM): “only takes a second”
jericho (6/16/2009 8:51:16 PM): this was when i averaged 100 ndm a day
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:51:32 PM): 10 seconds, 20 vulns a day for me…
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:51:43 PM): three minutes per day
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:51:51 PM): 20 minutes a week
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:51:58 PM): 1.5 hours a month
Lyger (6/16/2009 8:52:00 PM): etc etc

Think about that: something that “only takes a second” seems somewhat insignificant in a single instance, but when you multiply it over days, weeks, months… years… the time adds up. To be honest, time is what we (OSF) have been fighting against for years. If we individually spend an extra ten seconds working on one vulnerability, just to add references or classifications, no big deal, right? But then you might see that if we work on 20 or 30 a day, that’s an extra 4 or 5 minutes a day, about an extra 30 minutes a week, around two hours a month, and approximately one day out of a year.

Personally, I’d like to have my day back (when I can get it, preferably somewhere in Hawaii and on the OSF dime).

For quite a while, we’ve been asking for volunteers to spend maybe even 15 minutes a week on this project. That would add up to an hour a month, and multiplying that by even 10 solid hardcore volunteers (or 50 occasional ones) would be amazing. They would get no pay and no benefits, but maybe a t-shirt, a “thank you”, and a feeling of giving something back to the security community. All for even 15 minutes a week…

Or about two minutes a day…


Open Security Foundation Wins the SC Magazine 2009 Editor’s Choice Award

Open Security Foundation Wins the SC Magazine 2009 Editor’s Choice Award
by Lyger

Festivities in San Francisco wrapped up last night, and OSF was presented with SC Magazine’s 2009 Editor’s Choice Award. Thanks to everyone who has supported OSF in the past and present, and we definitely hope you’ll continue to support us in the future!

Open Security Foundation at RSA

A few members of the Open Security Foundation will be at RSA for a couple days. If anyone is going to be there and would like to meet up please let us know. At this point, we have most of the day on Tuesday open. Also, if you have any free day passes to the conference let us know that as well! =)

OSVDB Discussed on Faceoff Podcast

We just recently noticed that OSVDB was discussed during a podcast called Faceoff started by Jade Robbins and Mark Sanborn. In Episode 5: Scaling to Hit it Big, at about 19:54, they talk about OSVDB for several minutes. They cover the project in general and also review several of the basic features of OSVDB and how someone can use the site. They speak about the search capabilities and even mention that OSVDB has a vulnerbaility from back in 1965. This was submitted by Ryan Russell as part of our oldest vulnerability contest and I can now say Ryan has finally received his OSVDB schwag….. only took a couple years for him to get it! =)

They also explain how in addition to the website that the OSVDB database itself can be downloaded and used as well. To clarify a point they discuss, once you create an account with OSVDB you can download the database as many times as you want. They also spend some time discussing our Watchlist feature which I thought was pretty cool that it was mentioned. For those that are not aware, when you create an account you can then setup two types of Watchlists.

The Vendor/Product Watch list
This watchlist will alert you to vulnerabilities for specific products that you subscribe to. Alerts are generated when a vulnerability is updated to include the product and vendor information. Soon, we may introduce a feature that will enable alerting as soon as the vulnerability is processed through our systems.

The Mailing List Aggregation Watch list
OSVDB allows you to subscribe to roughly 20 vendor advisory mailing lists. The advisory mailings are sent to OSVDB, we process them, and forward them on to you. That way, rather than managing 20 individual advisory subscriptions, you only need to manage one through OSVDB.

Thanks to the guys at Faceoff for their support and it is worth listening to the entire podcast. It did make us laugh a bit as they commented at one point that WordPress has all kinds of vulnerabities. Most of our dedicated readers know the ongoing WordPress issues we had and our eventually move away from it! =)

Thanks also to Ryan Heimbuch for suggesting OSVDB to be reviewed.

OSVDB can also now be followed on Twitter:

Welcoming in 2009

Welcoming in 2009
by Lyger

OSVDB would like to wish everyone a happy and hopefully prosperous new year! 2008 was pretty cool for us as far as enhancements and support of OSVDB 2.0 go, and we were very happy to add over 11,000 new vulnerabilities to the database in the last year. We currently have over 51,000 vulnerabilities in the database to start the new year, and would like to invite everyone to please consider adding to this resource, whether you have a user account or not. We can use (and will gladly accept) as much help and input as we can get, so if you’re lacking a new year resolution, maybe consider an hour a week to assist the security industry gather and share knowledge about vulnerabilities.

OSVDB Account Signup

If you have any questions, comments, or ideas, please contact us at

General information can be found at

Happy new year, everyone!

No Safety In Numbers

From time to time we take a moment as a team to reflect on the project. In most cases a major milestone occurs and gets us to think about OSVDB and the security industry. Today OSVDB went over 50,000 entries in the database. One must keep in mind that these are only vulnerabilities that the industry knows about or have been made public. It has been said before that until you can truly measure something and express it in numbers you have only the very beginning of understanding on the subject. OSVDB continues to promote a greater understanding by providing accurate, detailed, current, and unbiased technical information on security vulnerabilities.

Looking for Volunteer Rails Developers!

Looking for Volunteer Rails Developers!
by D2D

The Open Security Foundation is looking for a few good Ruby on Rails developers to help us on a volunteer basis in developing and enhancing, as well as

We need folks who are interested in security, with a background in Ruby on Rails development.

For helping on OSVDB, you really need to have a solid understanding in these areas:

  • Single-table inheritance
  • SOLR
  • html/css/js

Dataloss DB isn’t as complex. A volunteer needs only to be experienced with REST and have already worked on RoR projects, but also have knowledge and experience with SOLR to help with the learning curve!

Both projects require experience with Subversion, and decent written communication skills.

If you’re interested in helping out, we encourage you to email us at:

moderators[at] (for OSVDB work), or curators[at] (for work).

In your email, please send a quick and informal resume with links to Ruby on Rails work you’ve done in the past, or projects you’re currently working on.

It’s not a job… it’s an adventure (or a hobby, or just a way to do something important for the InfoSec community!)

OSVDB in Vegas…..

The OSVDB team will definitely be in Vegas this year. If you would like to meet up then please drop a line to and let us know. Typically we organize an OSVDB dinner but we have been a little slack in organizing it this year! If you are interested let us know and we will see what we can make happen…

Look forward to seeing everyone soon…


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