Category Archives: OSVDB News

Ferreting Out Unique Vulnerability Data in OSVDB

In previous blog posts and on Twitter, I have shown and mentioned various methods for searching OSVDB to find interesting data. However, there is no written guide to the ins-and-outs of the data. The search interface is simple enough, but it can be used in a manner that allows for some complicated and useful searches that are not immediately obvious. This blog post will show several examples and highlight some of the interesting data we have available, along with an explanation to the method of our madness.

The OSVDB classification system allows for a variety of one-click searches. Using the search interface and selecting any of the classifications (single, or multiple) will let you quickly search for denial of service, exploit public, security software, and a lot more. Note that our data set is not complete, and not all of our entries have classification data. Do not rely on this type of search for complete results. Over time as the data set is completed, it will provide powerful one-click searches that will make for interesting metrics.

While our classification system is robust, it has been a struggle for us to determine if we want to add classes of issues as a new classification option, or use specific keywords that can be searched for. While a classification box is convenient, it can quickly become bloated if there are hundreds to choose from. We have “security software” as a classification because of the irony in software designed to protect you from threats adding to your vulnerability footprint. In the coming year, we may expand the ‘OSVDB’ classification box to allow for additional searches, where that box can be hidden entirely if desired. Until then, there are several fun keyword-based searches you can do:

  1. SCADA, the hot topic lately. Using the “vulnerability text” field, input “SCADA” and select “All Text” (defaults to “Titles only”). This will bring back all vulnerabilities related to SCADA products.
  2. Another field that has been interesting to us for several years, that will likely gain more attention this year in the wake of recent election problems, is Electronic Voting Machines. We’ve all read articles about the insecurity of Diebold for example. But have you looked at just how bad it is, and how bad the other vendors are? Do a “vulnerability text”, “all text” search for “electronic voting machine”. Prepare to be scared for the coming elections.
  3. There has been an increasing interest in vulnerabilities in embedded computers found in cars. While “car hacking” has been going on for many years, a big part of that field is based on modding and enhancing a car, not so much exploiting vulnerabilities in it. OSVDB has only delved into this topic a little bit so far, but it has been on our radar for some time. Doing the same “all text” search for the word “automobile” will bring up what we have. There are dozens of research papers and sites on our list to check out as time permits.
  4. We have spent a lot of time digging into the history of encryption algorithms, noting when they were effectively compromised or proven vulnerable to varying degrees of practical attacks. Having these in the database makes for an interesting history, great reference, and potentially helpful to pen-testers that find applications using insecure algorithms. Even if you don’t have time to leverage the weakness during the test, you can provide a standardized reference in the report. To find these, do a “vulnerability text”, “title only” search for the word “algorithm”.
  5. Using specific keywords in our standardized titles, quick searches can be performed for other interesting sets of vulnerabilities. For example, the word “hardcoded” is used to denote when a vendor uses an account name, password, community string, or other piece of identifying / security information in a manner that does not allow the user to change it. It is scary to see that hardcoded accounts and credentials are still being used in 2012, by security vendors no less. In a similar vein, the word “persistent” is used to denote other conditions where some form of weakness will continue to be present, regardless of administrative action.

Other interesting search tips:

  • “all text” word searches; botnet shows the increasing vulnerabilities found in botnet software
  • Want to find vulnerabilities in Drupal, but not all those third-party modules? Title search “drupal -module -theme” to see the ‘core’ software issues.
  • Similarly, title search for “wordpress” and “wordpress -plugin” to get a feel for the disparity in vulnerabilities between the core software and third-party plugins.

These represent just a few examples of the types of searches you can perform using OSVDB to ferret out interesting data and vulnerabilities that tend not to make it in the other VDBs.

Open Security Foundation Announces New Advisory Board

As security vulnerabilities and data loss incidents become a regular occurrence, the Open Security Foundation has grown from supporting a single project in 2004 to a leading provider of filtering through security information and providing notifications and aggregation for data for data loss and cloud security incidents.

The Open Security Foundation has evolved into one of the most utilized resources in providing security information, and as a 501c3 non-profit organization relies heavily on public contributions, volunteer effort and corporate sponsorships.

The growing demand for information to provide proper risk management has led to additional projects and now the introduction of an advisory board consisting of industry professionals to lend their expertise in areas to keep OSF moving in a positive direction and to be the first line of access to all that require their service.

Open Security Foundation CEO and founder Jake Kouns stated, “This is a very important step in shaping the future of the Open Security Foundation.” “OSF has reached a point in growth that requires a strategic move to provide longevity and sustainability. It has always been a goal of this organization to provide our work to the broadest audience and the introduction of the advisory board will contribute to that objective. I am extremely proud to be part of such an amazing organization that has built a reputation of excellence and serves a very important function,” adds Kouns. “We put out a call for qualified individuals that could provide guidance and insight to keep OSF a leader in the security information arena. The results of our search far exceeded our highest expectations; it’s not only provides us with confidence in our direction, but the impact OSF has had on the industry.”

The new advisory board members comprises of an array of specific industries that understand the importance of OSF resources. Each member was chosen for a specific contribution to ultimately achieve the objective and mission of this foundation and capable of providing broad based perspective on information security, business management and fundraising.

Tom Srail, Senior VP Willis Group provides 19 years of experience in the insurance industry with an expertise in risk consulting, professional liabilities, network security risks, intellectual property and technology professional risks.

Shawn Andreas, VP Marketing Guard Dog Inc. (GRDO.PK) will contribute his 20 years of experience in marketing and brand awareness to remake OSF to be more consumer and market friendly focusing on fundraising and sponsorships opportunities. His expertise in marketing spans over diverse markets and includes opportunities working with some of the country’s top companies including GM, Apple, Viacom and more.

Jim Hietala VP, Security for a leading IT standards organization, manages all security and risk management programs. Mr. Hietala is a frequent speaker at industry conferences. In addition he has published numerous articles on information security, risk management and compliance topics.

Daniel E. Geer, Jr. Sc.D. Chief Information security officer In-Q-Tel Washington. Mr. Geer has a list of accomplishments including participation in government advisory roles for the Federal Trade Commission, the Departments of Justice and Treasury, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the US Secret Service, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Andrew Lewman, Executive Director The Tor Project, Inc. Andrew Lewman is the Executive Director of The Tor Project, a non-profit organization. Mr. Lewman worked on projects with the National Science Foundation, Internews Network, Freedom House, Google, Broadcasting Board of Governors, National Network to End Domestic Violence, and the US State Department.

In addition to the advisory board, OSF also announces new leadership positions with the organization. We are pleased to announce that Becky Chickering and Corey Quinn are now curators for the DataLossDB project. We want to thank everyone that contacted OSF to volunteer their time and skills for the advisory board and flexibility as we went through this process. During our conversations with potential members we spoke with several passionate individuals that have a great deal to offer OSF. We plan to continue to expand our leadership team and are always looking for volunteers to help the organization.

Open Security Foundation Launches New Cloud Security Project

The Open Security Foundation, providing independent, accurate, detailed, current, and unbiased security information to professionals around the world, announced today that it has launched Cloutage (cloutage.org) that will bring enhanced visibility and transparency to Cloud security. The name Cloutage comes from a play on two words, Cloud and Outage, that combine to describe what the new website offers: a destination for organizations to learn about cloud security issues as well as a complete list of any problems around the globe among cloud service providers.

The new website is aimed at empowering organizations by providing cloud security knowledge and resources so that they may properly assess information security risks related to the cloud. Cloutage documents known and reported incidents with cloud services while also providing a one-stop shop for cloud security news and resources.

“When speaking with individuals about the cloud, to this point it has been a very emotional conversation. People either love or hate the cloud,” says Jake Kouns, Chairman, Open Security Foundation. “Our goal with Cloutage is to bring grounded data and facts to the conversation so we can have more meaningful discussions about the risks and how to improve cloud security controls.”

Cloutage captures data about incidents affecting cloud services in several forms including vulnerabilities that affect the confidentiality and integrity of customer data, automatic update failures, data loss, hacks and outages that impact service availability. Data is acquired from verifiable media resources and is also open for community participation based on anonymous user submissions. Cloud solution providers are listed on the website and the community can provide comments and ratings based on their experiences. Cloutage also features an extensive news service, mailing lists and links to organizations focused on the secure advancement of cloud computing.

“The nebulous world of cloud computing and the security concerns associated with it confuses many people, even IT and security professionals,” says Patrick McDonald, a volunteer on the Cloutage project. “We want a clearinghouse of information that provides a clear picture of the cloud security issues.”

March Update: Challenge: OSVDB Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal = done

Back in January, I issued a challenge to see how many new vulnerabilities would be entered into OSVDB over a three-month period. January went by, then February, and then March came and went. For anyone out there keeping score, here’s March’s totals:

2010-03-01: 32 vulns pushed, 164 vulns updated
2010-03-02: 27 vulns pushed, 149 vulns updated
2010-03-03: 9 vulns pushed, 73 vulns updated
2010-03-04: 53 vulns pushed, 207 vulns updated
2010-03-05: 17 vulns pushed, 94 vulns updated
2010-03-06: 9 vulns pushed, 56 vulns updated
2010-03-07: 4 vulns pushed, 103 vulns updated
2010-03-08: 25 vulns pushed, 125 vulns updated
2010-03-09: 42 vulns pushed, 157 vulns updated
2010-03-10: 24 vulns pushed, 243 vulns updated
2010-03-11: 7 vulns pushed, 64 vulns updated
2010-03-12: 52 vulns pushed, 148 vulns updated
2010-03-13: 4 vulns pushed, 15 vulns updated
2010-03-14: 2 vulns pushed, 43 vulns updated
2010-03-15: 18 vulns pushed, 136 vulns updated
2010-03-16: 77 vulns pushed, 232 vulns updated
2010-03-17: 31 vulns pushed, 277 vulns updated
2010-03-18: 48 vulns pushed, 458 vulns updated
2010-03-19: 3 vulns pushed, 224 vulns updated
2010-03-20: 25 vulns pushed, 100 vulns updated
2010-03-21: 3 vulns pushed, 222 vulns updated
2010-03-22: 18 vulns pushed, 101 vulns updated
2010-03-23: 0 vulns pushed, 60 vulns updated
2010-03-24: 5 vulns pushed, 20 vulns updated
2010-03-25: 39 vulns pushed, 162 vulns updated
2010-03-26: 38 vulns pushed, 245 vulns updated
2010-03-27: 40 vulns pushed, 95 vulns updated
2010-03-28: 18 vulns pushed, 41 vulns updated
2010-03-29: 14 vulns pushed, 329 vulns updated
2010-03-30: 46 vulns pushed, 413 vulns updated
2010-03-31: 44 vulns pushed, 341 vulns updated
2010-04-01: 63 vulns pushed, 397 vulns updated

Yes, we missed a day on the 23rd, but there’s a good excuse there. It was the following Tuesday after St. Patrick’s Day, which is usually around the time my hangover wears off and I realized that food and sleep are “good things”, so I took a day off. I think. If you have any evidence that I was conscious on March 23, mail me. Just curious.

Anyway, there you go. Over the course of the challenge, we promoted 2,060 new vulnerabilities into OSVDB, and as promised, I’ll be donating $1,030.00 to the Open Security Foundation. Extra special thanks go to all of the moderators and manglers who made it happen; you have no idea how much time and effort they all spent to get these vulnerabilities into the database. Now that the challenge is over, anybody out there who would like to match the challenge, even on a fractional basis (such as 25% of the amount donated), please contact us here and we’ll provide details.

- Lyger

February Update: OSVDB Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal

Back in early January, I issued a challenge to donate to OSF’s Winter Fundraiser for every new vulnerability pushed into OSVDB. Two of the three months have come and gone, and even though January was a little more productive than February in terms of new vulnerabilities, the moderation team is still making good progress:

2010-02-01: 13 vulns pushed, 133 vulns updated
2010-02-02: 31 vulns pushed, 79 vulns updated
2010-02-03: 25 vulns pushed, 145 vulns updated
2010-02-04: 21 vulns pushed, 31 vulns updated
2010-02-05: 25 vulns pushed, 153 vulns updated
2010-02-06: 8 vulns pushed, 76 vulns updated
2010-02-07: 3 vulns pushed, 278 vulns updated
2010-02-08: 27 vulns pushed, 64 vulns updated
2010-02-09: 47 vulns pushed, 159 vulns updated
2010-02-10: 37 vulns pushed, 160 vulns updated
2010-02-11: 16 vulns pushed, 59 vulns updated
2010-02-12: 27 vulns pushed, 128 vulns updated
2010-02-13: 10 vulns pushed, 51 vulns updated
2010-02-14: 4 vulns pushed, 112 vulns updated
2010-02-15: 12 vulns pushed, 81 vulns updated
2010-02-16: 23 vulns pushed, 181 vulns updated
2010-02-17: 28 vulns pushed, 235 vulns updated
2010-02-18: 25 vulns pushed, 119 vulns updated
2010-02-19: 43 vulns pushed, 261 vulns updated
2010-02-20: 11 vulns pushed, 126 vulns updated
2010-02-21: 2 vulns pushed, 34 vulns updated
2010-02-22: 3 vulns pushed, 64 vulns updated
2010-02-23: 41 vulns pushed, 221 vulns updated
2010-02-24: 37 vulns pushed, 112 vulns updated
2010-02-25: 15 vulns pushed, 138 vulns updated
2010-02-26: 17 vulns pushed, 146 vulns updated
2010-02-27: 9 vulns pushed, 17 vulns updated
2010-02-28: 8 vulns pushed, 24 vulns updated

With 568 new vulnerabilities pushed in February, we’re now up to 1,223 new entries for 2010; personally, I’d like to see that number hit at least 2,000 by the end of March (3,000 may be out of reach, but never say never), but that will depend on the time and efforts of our moderation team and the amount of vulnerabilities uncovered by our multiple reference sources. Please remember that I will donate $0.50 to OSF for every new vulnerability pushed into the database through April 1 (and no, there will not be an April Fools announcement saying that the challenge has been called off), and we’re hoping to obtain some matching offers to help offset the costs of maintaining the database. A special “thank you” goes to all parties who have offered to match the challenge so far, and we hope others who find OSVDB to be a valuable resource can jump in and help us out as well.

31 more days for the challenge… and away… we… go.

- Lyger

Open Security Foundation – Advisory Board – Call for Nominations

The Open Security Foundation (OSF) is an internationally recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit public organization seeking senior leaders capable of providing broad-based perspective on information security, business management and fundraising to volunteer for an Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will provide insight and guidance when developing future plans, an open forum for reviewing community feedback and a broader view when prioritizing potential new services.

OSF was founded in 2004 and has been operated by information security enthusiasts since its inception. We exist to empower all types of organizations by providing knowledge and resources so that they may properly protect, detect and mitigate information security risks. We believe that security information and services should be easily accessible for all who have the need for such information. We promote open collaboration between companies and individuals, provide unbiased information to uphold educated decision-making, and attempt to eliminate the need for redundant works while striving to improve organizations’ overall security posture.

Prospective Advisory Board members should show an ability and willingness to:

  • Participate actively in all meetings of the Advisory Board (2 times per year and as otherwise needed)
  • Represent OSF and its mission to organizations and the general public
  • Review and provide feedback for proposed OSF plans
  • Chair and serve as members of committees
  • Assist in locating and developing funding sources for OSF

If you are interested in volunteering please email us at officers@opensecurityfoundation.org and provide the following information:

Name:
Phone Number:
Email Address:
Area of Expertise:

If you know someone with senior leader experience who you believe could act in an advisory position please contact us at officers @ opensecurityfoundation.org.

The call for Advisory Board volunteers will be open until March 19, 2010. We will review all submissions by March 31, 2010.

Open Security Foundation – State of the Union 2010

The Open Security Foundation (OSF) has grown from a humble beginning in 2004 to an internationally recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit public organization. Through the work of a small team of dedicated information security enthusiasts, the Open Source Vulnerability Database (OSVDB) and DataLossDB projects have provided organizations of all sizes with the knowledge and resources to accurately detect, protect and mitigate information security risks. OSF research is often cited throughout the security industry and the organization was honored by being named winner of the SC Magazine’s Editors Choice award for 2009.

To ensure the highest quality information that has become the trademark of OSF, a tremendous amount of effort is expended on a daily basis by OSF volunteers to process an ever increasing amount of data loss and vulnerability reports. Over the years, many volunteers have been involved in the projects, but for the most part the the heavy lifting has been the work of only a few very dedicated volunteers. The “open source” approach to resourcing the projects has been successful to date but is now proving to be an unsustainable model. With long-term sustainability and increased services as our goal, we have initiated a comprehensive review of our current operations, our existing approach to project funding and the creation of potential new services for the security community.

As a start, we plan to do a better job of sharing our view on the state of the information security industry and creating a mechanism to gain community feedback to better establish our vision for the OSVDB and DataLossDB projects.

To that end I want to take a moment to share our initial plans for 2010.

The OSF officers and project leads have been dedicated to the daily operations required to make OSVDB and DataLossDB the recognized leader in vulnerability and data loss tracking. This focused dedication has left little time to take the pulse of the industry as it relates to our projects or to establish a clear long-term vision for the projects. To address this need, OSF will be creating an Advisory Board. The board will consist of three to five senior leaders capable of providing broad based perspective on information security, business management and fundraising. It is our hope that this will provide a sounding board when developing future plans, an open forum when reviewing community feedback and a broader view when prioritizing potential new services. Additional information along with an official call for Advisory Board nominations is planned for 2/12/2010.

Direct unfiltered feedback from both the security community as well as the organizations that benefit from our projects is critical. Over the next few weeks, we plan to post a public survey asking for feedback that will help shape our long-term vision and establish our near-term plans for OSVDB and DataLossDB. Those of you who value the work that the OSF provides and/or consider yourselves friends and supporters of OSF are asked to help spread the word to maximize the feedback provided.

Feedback from the survey will be the foundation for the OSF vision and 2010 plan. Our goal is to present a draft of both the vision and the 2010 plan to the newly formed Advisory Board by mid-April 2010. Once finalized, both documents will be shared with the information security community.

OSF has been recognized for providing a critical service to the information security community but our potential is much greater. We look forward to hearing your ideas on how OSF can further improve the state of security while building a stronger organization to deliver even higher quality research and additional services.

We appreciate your support and if you are interested in working with OSF please contact us at moderators @ osvdb.org or curators @ datalossdb.org.

Jake Kouns
Chairman, Open Security Foundation

January Update: OSVDB Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal

Well, it’s been almost a month since we issued our original challenge for the “OSVDB Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal”. As mentioned in our initial post, we’re pretty transparent about how much work we do on a daily/weekly/monthly basis. Thanks to Twitter, pico, and my /home/lyger/wtf-ever folder, we present January’s results:

2010-01-01: 23 vulns pushed, 56 vulns updated
2010-01-02: 21 vulns pushed, 194 vulns updated
2010-01-03: 11 vulns pushed, 143 vulns updated
2010-01-04: 25 vulns pushed, 104 vulns updated
2010-01-05: 50 vulns pushed, 184 vulns updated
2010-01-06: 13 vulns pushed, 94 vulns updated
2010-01-07: 15 vulns pushed, 78 vulns updated
2010-01-08: 33 vulns pushed, 162 vulns updated
2010-01-09: 1 vulns pushed, 127 vulns updated
2010-01-10: 17 vulns pushed, 208 vulns updated
2010-01-11: 30 vulns pushed, 325 vulns updated
2010-01-12: 32 vulns pushed, 385 vulns updated
2010-01-13: 21 vulns pushed, 119 vulns updated
2010-01-14: 18 vulns pushed, 79 vulns updated
2010-01-15: 26 vulns pushed, 199 vulns updated
2010-01-16: 65 vulns pushed, 102 vulns updated
2010-01-17: 15 vulns pushed, 75 vulns updated
2010-01-18: 21 vulns pushed, 130 vulns updated
2010-01-19: 20 vulns pushed, 48 vulns updated
2010-01-20: 22 vulns pushed, 142 vulns updated
2010-01-21: 18 vulns pushed, 83 vulns updated
2010-01-22: 16 vulns pushed, 86 vulns updated
2010-01-23: 16 vulns pushed, 27 vulns updated
2010-01-24: 6 vulns pushed, 30 vulns updated
2010-01-25: 25 vulns pushed, 114 vulns updated
2010-01-26: 8 vulns pushed, 70 vulns updated
2010-01-27: 16 vulns pushed, 90 vulns updated
2010-01-28: 26 vulns pushed, 87 vulns updated
2010-01-29: 20 vulns pushed, 28 vulns updated
2010-01-30: 14 vulns pushed, 52 vulns updated
2010-01-31: 11 vulns pushed, 40 vulns updated

As of early morning February 1, we have pushed 655 new vulnerabilities into the database since the beginning of 2010. Please take a moment to look at the dates listed above; if you find a day missing from January, please let us know. Yes, we laid off on the 9th (Jericho made the save with OSVDB 61571 : EcShop /admin/integrate.php Multiple Parameter Arbitrary Command Execution), but the honest fact is that we generally work on OSVDB *every day* in some form. Some days are slower than others, sure… we still have families, friends, and other hobbies (believe it or not). Actually, the number of OSVDB moderators who own a Wii with the Fit Plus package is scary, but I digress.

So, about the challenge we presented… I’m still willing to put up $0.50 HARD U.S. DOLLARS for every new vulnerability we push from January 1, 2010 through April 1, 2010. I pushed it through April 1 and not just March 31 because a) April 1 is a much cooler day to end a contest, 2) February 29 is a special day and should never be left out of any year, so an extra day was warranted, and d) that’s the period that Dave set up the end of the fundraising goal for, and we try to keep him happy so things don’t randomly 500 when we do something like enter weird support tickets..

Any company or person who still wants to match my offer, please feel free to do so. Even though we’re only at about 2/3 of our usual push rate, we’re not intentionally laying back to keep the new vulnerability count lower. Coming off a holiday season takes time to get back in the groove, not only for us but our reference providers as well. Please mail us at our moderators@ address if you want to contribute.

- Lyger

Challenge: OSVDB Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal

OSVDB has just announced its Winter 2010 Fundraising Goal, which currently hopes to raise $9,000 before April 1, 2010. Looking back over the last couple of years of advances in the project, it’s easy to see not only how the project has evolved, but also how operational costs have increased to cover software development, content development, server hosting costs, and other assorted expenses to help keep OSVDB interesting, timely, and functional.

On an average, OSVDB has promoted 10,000 to 12,000 vulnerabilites per year for the last the last few years. Breaking that down to about 1,000 per month, the vulnerabilities in the database are gathered from a variety of sources, such as CVE, Secunia and various vendor changelogs and advisories. Keeping up a pace of about 1,000 newly listed vulerabilities per month hasn’t always been easy… but it’s about to get interesting.

I recently resigned my position as Chief Communications Officer with Open Security Foundation to focus more on the “content” aspect of OSVDB and DataLossDB. The extra time gained from giving up administrative duties will hopefully help the sites keep content fresh and accurate. Jericho, CJI, and I are going to keep working on new vulnerabilities as we can and keep the ball rolling.

With that said, I’m issuing a challenge: For every new vulnerability issued an OSVDB ID from January 1, 2010 through April 1, 2010, I will donate $0.50 (fiddy cents) of my own money to the OSVDB fundraiser. I challenge anyone who feels that OSVDB is a valuable resource to the security community to match my donation.

To make a few points clear:

  1. I am no longer an OSF officer. My donation comes out of my own pocket, not the OSF coffers, and I will accept no compensation from OSF for this offer. If I have to sell a kidney, I hear you only need one anyway.
  2. Since Jericho, CJI, and I are the ones who generally push new vulnerabilities to “live” status, there will be no slacking to save my bank account. If anything, I’ll be more motivated to push the potential donations higher and they’ll be motivated to watch me suffer on April 2. That’s how we roll.
  3. At an average of 1,000 vulnerabilities a month, over three months I expect to donate $1,500. It may be less, it may be more. There will be a maximum cap of $2,500 donated by myself and anyone who matches it. If we can push 5,000 vulns in three months, something is either very wrong or very great. YMMV.
  4. If five other people and/or groups take me up on the challenge and we meet our average, OSF will meet its goal. We still hope everyone else will contribute not only time but *effort* to help the project.
  5. This is not a gimmick. It’s not smoke and mirrors. You can see what OSVDB pushes on a daily basis on our Twitter page and on our contributors page. We will push all legitimate vulnerabilities just as we have been doing for years. If we’re slow for a few days, don’t worry. We’ll catch up.

So, that’s the challenge. If anyone wants to play and match my offer, please contact us at moderators[at]osvdb.org. I’m going back to work now.

- Lyger

OSVDB 2009 Q4 Changelog

I always mean to post changes more frequently, but apathy and other tasks seem to win the day. Here is a brief list of OSVDB change highlights over the past few months.

Content:

Search:

Other:

  • New menu system (top and left nav)
  • Twitter feed more actively used for project updates
  • Twitter feed displays on front page
  • ‘About’ page is updated, expect more static pages to be updated to better reflect project status soon
  • CVSSv2 scoring support added, including:
  • CVSS scoring history (historically track NVD, OSVDB and other sources)
  • Anyone can submit scores for entries without CVE/NVD (over 13,000)
  • Updating CVSS scores for entries without are worth .25 points for now, to encourage mangling
  • Moderation system in place for submitted CVSS scores
  • Creditee system overhaul (http://blog.osvdb.org/2009/11/21/creditee-system-overhauled)
  • “Vulnerabilities in OSVDB disclosed by type by quarter” graphs added to front page
  • More fixes to continue support for IE6. Don’t expect this to last!
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