I could do this all day… (Poor vuln stats from @GFISoftware)

Despite the talk given at BlackHat 2013 by Steve Christey and myself, companies continue to produce pedestrian and inaccurate statistics. This batch comes from Cristian Florian at GFI Software and offers little more than confusing and misleading statistics. Florian falls into many of the traps and pitfalls outlined previously.

These are compiled from data from the National Vulnerability Database (NVD).

There’s your first problem, using a drastically inferior data set than is available. The next bit really invalidates the rest of the article:

On average, 13 new vulnerabilities per day were reported in 2013, for a total of 4,794 security vulnerabilities: the highest number in the last five years.

This is laughable. OSVDB cataloged 10,472 disclosed vulnerabilities for 2013 (average of 28 a day), meaning these statistics were generated with less than half of known vulnerabilities. 2013 was our third year of breaking 10,000 vulnerabilities, where the rest have a single year (2006) if any at all. Seriously; what is the point of generating statistics when you knowingly use a data set lacking so much? Given that 2012 was another ’10k’ year, the statement about it being the highest number in the last five years is also wrong.

Around one-third of these vulnerabilities were classified ‘high severity’, meaning that an exploit for these vulnerabilities would have a high impact on the attacked systems.

By who? Who generated these CVSS scores exactly, and why isn’t that disclaimed in the article? Why no mention of the ‘CVSS 10′ scoring problem as VDBs must default to that for a completely unspecified issue? With a serious number of vulnerabilities either scored by vendors with a history of incorrect scoring, or VDBs forced to use ’10’ for unspecified issues, these numbers are completely meaningless and skewed.

The vulnerabilities were discovered in software provided by 760 different vendors, but the top 10 vendors were found to have 50% of the vulnerabilities:

I would imagine Oracle is accurate on this table, as we have cataloged 570 vulnerabilites in 2013 from them. However, the rest of the table is inaccurate because #2 is wrong. You say Cisco with 373, I say ffmpeg with 490. You say #10 is HP with 112 and I counter that WebKit had 139 (which in turn adds to Apple and Google among others). You do factor in that whole “software library” thing, right? For example, what products incorporate ffmpeg that have their own vulnerabilities? These are contenders for taking the #1 and #2 spot on the table.

Most Targeted Operating Systems in 2013

As we frequently see, no mention of severity here. Of the 363 Microsoft vulnerabilities in 2013, compared to the 161 Linux Kernel issues, impact and severity is important to look at. Privilege escalation and code execution is typical in Microsoft, while authenticated local denial of service accounts for 22% of the Linux issues (and only 1% for Microsoft).

In 2013 web browsers continued to justle – as in previous years – for first place on the list of third-party applications with the most security vulnerabilities. If Mozilla Firefox had the most security vulnerabilities reported last year and in 2009, Google Chrome had the “honor” in 2010 and 2011, it is now the turn of Microsoft Internet Explorer to lead with 128 vulnerabilities, 117 of them ‘critical’.

We already know your numbers are horribly wrong, as you don’t factor in WebKit vulnerabilities that affect multiple browsers. Further, what is with the sorting of this table putting MSIE up top despite it not being reported with the most vulnerabilities?

Sticking to just the browsers, Google Chrome had 297 reported vulnerabilities in 2013 and that does not count additional WebKit issues that very likely affect it. Next is Mozilla and then Microsoft IE with Safari at the lowest (again, ignoring the WebKit issue).

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One response

  1. Good analysis. Like you, I hate amateur hour in statistics.

    And what’s with ‘justle’? It’s an archaic form of ‘jostle’ that I have never seen anywhere else. Their English isn’t much better than their math.

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