How many people work on this project?

We are occasionally asked how many people work on OSVDB. This question comes from those familiar with the project, and potential customers of our vulnerability intelligence feed. Back in the day, I had no problem answering it quickly and honestly. For years we limped along with one “full time” (unpaid volunteer) and a couple part-timers (unpaid volunteers), where those terms were strictly based on the hours worked. Since the start of 2012 though, we have had actual full-timers doing daily work on the project. This comes through the sponsorship provided by Risk Based Security (RBS), who also provided us with a good amount of developer time and hosting resources. Note that we are also frequently asked how much data comes from the community, to which we giggle and answer “virtually none” (less than 0.01%).

These days however, I don’t like to answer that question because it frequently seems to be a recipe for critique. For example, on one potential client call we were asked how many employees RBS had working on the offering. I answered honestly, that it was only three at time, because that was technically true. That didn’t represent the number of bodies as one was full-time but not RBS, and two were not full time. Before that could be qualified the potential client scoffed loudly, “there is no way you do that much with so few people”. Despite explaining that we had more than three people, I simply offered for them to enjoy a 30 day free trial of our data feed. Let the data answer his question.

To this day, if we say we have #lownumber, we get the response above. If we say we have #highnumber that includes part timers and drive-by employees (that are not tasked with this work but can dabble if they like), then we face criticism that we don’t output enough. Yes, despite us aggregating and producing over twice as much content as any of our competitors, we face that silly opinion. The number of warm bodies also doesn’t speak to the skill level of everyone involved. Two of our full time workers (one paid, one unpaid) have extensive history managing vulnerability databases and have continually evolved the offerings over the years. While most VDBs look the same as they did 10 years ago, OSVDB has done a lot to aggregate more data and more meta-data about each vulnerability than anyone else. We have been ahead of the curve at almost every turn, understanding and adapting to the challenges and pitfalls of VDBs.

So to officially answer the question, how many people work on this project? We have just enough. We make sure that we have the appropriate resources to provide the services offered. When we get more customers, we’ll hire more people to take on the myriad of additional projects and data aggregation we have wanted to do for years. Data that we feel is interesting and relevant, but no one is asking for yet. Likely because they haven’t thought of it, or haven’t realized the value of it. We have a lot more in store, and it is coming sooner than later now that we have the full support of RBS. If you are using any other vulnerability intelligence feed, it is time to consider the alternative.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,759 other followers

%d bloggers like this: